Home Projects for the Valentine’s Day Honey-Do List

Dad does it all

Sure! Flowers are nice and dinner out is almost always a success. But if you really want to say, “I love you,” try one of these easy February home maintenance projects and show what it really means to love someone!

Freshen up the bedrooms.
Wash all of your sheets and blankets and run them through the sanitize cycle on your washing machine. Are your pillows able to go in the washer? Wash those, too! And any bed covers that can be washed should be and others should go to the dry cleaners. Fresh bedding makes for a fresher home.

Dust the places no one sees.
So we dust our table tops, shelves and book cases. But how often do we dust those places no one sees? February is the perfect month to dust the tops of door frames, dust window ledges and wall boards. Dust all the lamp shades and bulbs, too.You’ll be surprised at how much brighter everything looks because you do this task.

Clean your windows.
Let the winter sun warm your house up even more (or make it sparkle anyway!) by washing the windows. You may not be able to do the outside windows in the cold weather, but you’ll see an immediate improvement in your home, if you simply clean the insides of the windows. Dust the blinds and spot clean your curtains.

Clean under your furniture.
You don’t have to vacuum the entire house if you don’t want to (but you will when you start this project!), but move the couches and the chairs and tables and vacuum beneath them. If there’s a place that you usually work around, then now is the perfect time to move it and clean where no one sees.

Wipe the places that get touched a lot!
Take some time to clean the places that never get cleaned but should. Wipe down the legs of chairs and tables, door knobs and light switches, and the knobs on all cabinets and drawers. If you touch it to turn it on or off or to open or close something, clean it today!

Clean small kitchen appliances.
Do you have a spotless microwave and an oven so clean you are proud to leave the door open? Yet, if someone were to look at the bottom of your mixer, they’d see cake batter from two years ago? It’s time to clean your small kitchen appliances. Wipe down your mixers; change the filters on your coffee pot and run a water vinegar mix through it; shake out the toaster crumbs. What other appliances can you find to clean?

These are six Valentine’s Day Honey-Do jobs that will prove you love everyone in your home, and yourself, too! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Teach Your Kids to Love Their Home and DIY Projects

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Do you want your kids to grow up and already love a good DIY home maintenance project or at least understand the value of a clean and tidy home? Start working with them while they are young. Kids actually think cleaning the house or helping with home repairs is fun, so the sooner you engage them in this, the better.

Start while they’re young. While involving kids in housework and home maintenance may take more time, getting kids started while they are young will teach them the importance of caring for a home and taking on some hard work. Kids can hold flashlights, hand you tools or carry a light toolbox. Older kids can help with the screwdriver, replace light bulbs or take part in chores like vacuuming or cleaning

Get kids their own toolbox or yard tools like a kids’ rake or lawn mower. Let them imitate you nearby. This makes participation a game.

Talk about what you’re doing. As you work on home projects such as gardening, painting, repairing, cleaning, talk to your kids about what you are doing. You can teach them more and keep them chatting.

Let them decorate their own rooms. Kids spend a lot of time in their rooms so the more they do to make them their own, the more they will like them. They will also feel ownership and want to be in charge of keeping their rooms clean. Comfortable is important.

Teach your kids about important jobs for home owners that some adults don’t think about, including:

Help them locate the breaker box and flip the correct switch when you lose power. They can also help you label the breaker box, a task that a lot of homeowners plan to take on but never do. Kids love to run around the house and let you know what lights are off or on when you flip a switch.

Show them where to turn off the water for the house or in a bathroom. Kids are known for putting weird things down toilets. No matter how often you say not to, they still do it. Even if you don’t show them where the house water turns off, show them how to turn off an overflowing or running toilet.

Change batteries in smoke alarms. Let kids help you change the batteries in smoke alarms. You should do this twice a year and it’s a great time to teach kids about home maintenance and home safety. This could even be a good time to talk to your kids about a fire evacuation plan.

And make a quick cleaning fun!

Have a Musical Cleaning Event! For a fun cleaning game, turn on your favorite fast song and have a race to see who can clean up the most toys while the song plays. Whenever you turn the song on, the kids clean. ! Kids think this is a blast and race to beat each other. You end up with tired kids and a clean room!

Rest Easy by Setting Up Your Bedroom for a Good Night’s Sleep

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Are you ready for a good night’s sleep, but your bedroom is not? A few simple changes can have you sleeping like a baby again in no time.

If you need a new mattress, get one.
You don’t need a fancy mattress. The mattress that allows you to sink into a deep, natural sleep and wake up in the morning without aches and pains is the one you want. And there’s only one way to find out which mattress that is. You have to sleep on it. Find a shop with 30-day guarantee and give your mattress a test drive for a month.

Find the right pillows.
Make sure your pillows are as comfortable as your mattress. You may need to try out several different kinds before you find your perfect pillow, but these are a must for a good night’s sleep.

Sooth with a soft scent.
A spritz lavender scent on your pillows before bed will help calm your exhausted mind.

Chill before bed.
Lower the temperature of your bedroom before you climb into bed. Lower temperatures tell your body it’s time to sleep. If your bed partner objects, tell him to bundle up.

Control the noises you can control.
If the dog’s snoring wakes you up, then put him in another room. If your partner snores, work to find treatment. Snoring can do more than just wake someone up. It can be a real health concern. You’ll sleep better with less noise and when you know everyone is healthy.

Close the curtains.
You sleep better in the dark. If your eyelids flutter open as you move from one stage of sleep to another, even streetlights or a full moon can wake you up.

Turn off the lights.
Your brain can misinterpret even dim lights and wonder if it should wake you up.

Pull on socks.
Studies have found that wearing socks to bed helps you sleep. It may be that warming your feet and legs allows your internal body temperature to drop.

Ignore the clock.
Turn your clock’s face or digital readout away so you can’t see it. We wake slightly throughout the night. A glimpse of your clock—and the realization that you have to get up soon—is enough to jolt you out of sleep and keep you out.

Turn off your phone.
A text, an email or a social media message can produce a ping on your phone and cause it to light up. There’s nothing about a cell phone that makes your sleep sounder. If you think you need it for its alarm, get an alarm clock.

Ready to rest easier knowing your questions about home mortgages are answered?

Keep Your Fresh Cut Flowers Fresh Longer

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We are smack dab in the middle of winter. That means you have to bring some spring and summer freshness into your home to feel a little warmer inside. Fresh cut flowers may be what you need to feel warm, cozy and spring, when it’s cold outside. Want to keep your blooms fresher longer? Try some of these tips.

Start by Snipping the Stems.
Flowers have a vascular system in their stems that draws up water and nutrients to feed the blooms. If you don’t cut them, air that has been drawn into the stems while they were out of water can block water absorption. Use sharp scissors or pruning shears, and snip 1/2 inch off the bottom of the stems at a 45-degree angle. Every three days trim about 1 inch. Why do you cut the stems at an angle? It allows the flower stem to take in more water.

Trim the Foliage.
Before putting the flowers in water, trim as much foliage as you can off the flowers, if the foliage will rest under the water line. This will decrease the bacteria in the water and keep your vase clear and prevent odors. It also will redistribute the flowers’ resources to the main blooms. There will probably be some foliage in the water, but try to remove some.

Select the Right Vase.
Make sure the opening of the vase is the right size: Not so narrow that it crowds the flowers; not so wide that the arrangement loses its shape. You can even choose a short vase and really cut the stems. Fill the vase about two thirds full with fresh, cool water. Don’t use warm water. Warm water may make the flowers open faster.

Place the Flowers in Water Quickly.
Don’t waste time getting your bouquets back into water. You can even cut the stems while holding the stems in water. No matter what, don’t let the flowers lay on the counter for long!

Get the Temperature Right.
Keep fresh flowers from direct sun and other heat sources, including heat vents. To take it one step further put the arrangement in the fridge overnight. According to FTD, this strategy is the best way to preserve a bouquet.

Change the Water.
Fresh flowers need to drink fresh, clean water, every one to three days. Dump all the water out, swirl hot water in the vase to kill any bacteria and add fresh, cool water back to the vase. If the stems are ready to be cut, trim them. If there’s more foliage you can remove, remove that.

Remove Wilting Flowers.
Remove wilting flowers from the arrangement. They can get moldy and contaminate other flowers.

Place the Flowers in the Right Spot.
Flowers and fruit are not friends. Fruit and vegetables gives off ethylene gas, which causes flowers to wilt. One apple won’t make a difference, but keeping your flowers away from a large bowl of produce is a good idea.

It may not spring, but it can feel like spring in your house with some fresh blooms that stay fresh just a little longer.

Things You Should Do Immediately When You Move into a New Home

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You have a new home. Here are some great tips for things to do when you first move in to start saving money. Once the boxes are unpacked, tackle these tasks next.

Check the insulation in your attic. You should have about six inches of insulation throughout the attic. If you need more, get more! Click here for a guide from the Department of Energy on proper attic insulation.

Make sure the vents in all rooms are clear of dust and obstructions. Covering vents with anything makes your heating and cooling system work harder. And a quick dusting will help you remove dust and dust bunnies to keep these cleaner. If you need to, have a professional come out and clean all of your duct work.

Mark cracks in the basement with masking tape. It’s not unusual for basements to settle and for the floor to crack. But if you do have a problem with settling and cracking, you’ll want to take care of that sooner rather than later. Cover up the ends of cracks with masking tape. In a few months, if the cracks have grown outside of the original tape, call a professional for some repair work before the problem grows.

Plant some shade trees near your home. Get a natural cooling system working for you. Plant some trees near your house to add shade. Lowering the external temperature of your home can save you from running the air conditioning hard and all the time, when the sun is shining in the summer heat. The sooner you plant them, the sooner they can grow and help cool your home.

If you have to buy new appliances, buy energy efficient. You’ll likely pay more up front for these, but you’ll save money in the end. For example, a refrigerator that uses little energy and lasts 20 years is much less costly over time.

Check your toilets and under-sink plumbing. You don’t want these pipes leaking or discover you have a toilet that is constantly running. A dripping pipe may seem harmless enough, but the cost adds up in water and you may end up creating a mold problem.

Create a home maintenance checklist and run through it for the first time. And then run through it every month. Include things you want to check monthly or quarterly. Check plumbing, vents, outlets, paint, windows, etc. And while you’re at it, include a checklist for changing batteries in smoke detectors, something you should do at least once a year.

These are just a handful of tips to save money. Want more?
Read 18 Things a New Homeowner Should Do Immediately to Save Money.

Make More Room in Your Kitchen

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There are some ways to make even the smallest kitchen seem bigger and gain some awesome storage space you weren’t expecting. Try these tips as you start thinking about ways to make the kitchen you have the dream kitchen you want.

Before doing anything else….PURGE!

Grab a garbage bag and start throwing things away. Clean out your pantry, cabinets, freezer and refrigerator. Anything outdated including cereals, spices, canned goods and more can go. Old sponges, storage containers with no lids, expired meats, freezer burned soups and vegetables, and old leftovers all can be discarded. You’ll feel good about starting from scratch, and you will know what you have and what you need when you go to the store.

When you do go to the store, only buy what you need. If you’re a bulk shopper, store extra items in the garage or basement, but keep them out of the kitchen.

Hide your chairs. If you have an island or counter seating in your kitchen, buy a couple of low stools that you can push underneath and out of the way.

Put small appliances away. Toasters, mixers and other kitchen appliances are tools, not decorations. Put them in one of the larger cabinets until they are used again for meal prep.

Buy some cabinet shelving and dividers. You can purchase some inexpensive cabinet shelving for stackable pots and pans, serving dishes, vases and pitchers. It’s an easy fix to get some quick storage space back.

Get a smaller table. If you have a small dining nook, then you need a small table. You may even find one with folding parts so you can make it larger and smaller as needed.

Attach a sanitation rack to cabinet below the sink. These are inexpensive and easy to affix to the wall of the cabinet. Put your dish soap, sponges, and other frequently used cleaning products in it. They are easy to get to and off the sink.

Hang your plants. Get your houseplants off the counter by hanging them up or putting them on upper shelves.

A lot of families spend more time in their kitchens than any other rooms in their home. Make it a room you want to be in!

Your Attic May Be the Storage Solution You Are Looking For

 

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Your attic may be the solution to your storage problems. But not all attics are the same, so before you begin using the space above your house, make sure you do some careful planning. Here are some tips to get you started.

Assess your space. If you have never used your attic for storage before you’ll want to really take a good look at the space you have. How much room is usable? Is it structurally sound for storage? How much weight can it hold? Storing a few holiday decorations is very different from storing furniture. This may be a good time to contact a contractor for some professional advice.

Test the weight it can hold. Some attics have solid, structurally sound floors. Others may require some good reinforcement. If you are able to walk in your attic, do so carefully. The supports may not be as good as your regular floors. Try to walk where you know there are beams.

Check for needed repairs. This space is often forgotten by homeowners, but not by squirrels and mice. Check for signs of rodents, including rodent droppings. And check all electrical wiring. Rodents often chew wires so be extra cautious.

Buy plastic storage bins. Use plastic bins rather than boxes to keep rodents away. They also will provide better protection if your roof leaks.

Hang hooks and shelves. This should be an easy task because the walls are usually unfinished so you can see exactly where to hang these.

Check out the nooks and crannies. You can usually push storage crates into some unusual areas.

Plan carefully for what to store in an attic. This space can be a great hiding place for items you don’t use often. It’s not a good space for candles, photos, paintings or other items that can be damaged by fluctuating temperatures and changes in humidity. Although it may be tempting to store family heirlooms in the attic, you may want to consider places that have more consistent temperatures and humidity levels for preservation.

Whether you use your attic space for storage or not, make sure you check the space out periodically. You don’t want to be surprised by squirrels making their home or leaks you didn’t know about. A good once-over every few months will keep this space ready for you when you need it.