Spring Clean Your Financial Paperwork

Couple managing the debt

If you’re spring cleaning, you might be ready to go through your entire house and get rid of anything that doesn’t bring you joy. While your financial paperwork likely isn’t something that brings you joy, that doesn’t mean you can toss it into the trash. Learn about what you should be saving, how long you need to keep it, and how you can organize it, so it fits in with your newly tidy house.

Tax Returns: Keep for three years from the date you filed. If you filed a claim for a loss, keep for your return seven years.

Receipts: Keep receipts for itemized deductions on your tax return with your tax records for three years.

Paycheck Stubs: Keep until the end of the year.

Medical Bills: Keep for one year. If you deduct medical expenses on your taxes, keep with the returns for three years.

Utility Bills: Keep for one year. If you claim a home office tax deduction on your taxes, keep with the returns for three years.

Bank Statements: Keep for three years.

Credit Card Statements: Keep until you can confirm the charges and have paid the bill. Keep for three years if you need them for tax deductions.

Paid Off Loans: Keep for seven years.

Active Contracts, Property Records, Insurance Documents, and Stock Certificates: Keep as long as they’re active. Once they’re complete, you can discard.

Marriage License, Birth Certificates, Adoption Papers, Wills, Death Certificates, and Paid Mortgages: Keep forever.

Once you have all your financial papers in order, purchase a few storage boxes to hold everything. Label the outside with what’s in the box so you always know where your important financial documents are located.

Source: Her Money

9 Tips to Get Your Home Ready for Spring

senior man stands on ladder and cleans a roof gutter

Spring’s popping up all over. Longer days, early blooms – these are signs that it’s time to make some simple home repairs after the long winter. Here are 9 simple jobs to take care of in order to make sure you’re ready for the change of seasons.

Inspect your roof. Check for loose or missing shingles, and ensure that seals around skylights are in tact and that chimney flashing is still in good shape. You don’t want any leaks during spring showers.

Check your gutters. While you’re inspecting your roof, inspect your gutters, too. They may have been overworked in the winter, with ice dams and falling branches. Clear the debris, check your downspouts and drains, and make sure the gutters are still secured to the house.

Check your pipes. Pipes that freeze and then thaw can cause some problems. Look for sign of damage under your sinks. And while you’re checking pipes, now is a good time to check your washing machine and dishwasher hoses and do a quick check in the attic, basement and crawl spaces for leaks.

Inspect your siding. Do a quick walk-around of your house and make sure no siding has been damaged or come loose.

Caulk your windows and doors to make sure these are sealed and still able to protect your windows and doors from water getting in.

Check your screens for tears. As long as you’re caulking your windows, check your screens, too. If any have tears or holes, now is a good time to repair those so you can open your windows and let in the fresh air.

Patch driveway and sidewalk cracks. Shoveling and salt can do a job on your cement in the winter, leading to cracks. Repair these now to keep them from growing and causing bigger problems.

Get your heating and air system checked. Call a qualified and recommended HVAC technician to come out and do a check on your system. Your heater worked hard in the winter and now your air conditioning is going to work hard in the summer. Make sure it’s in top condition. And, while you’re at it, change your filters.

Check trees and bushes for broken limbs and snapped branches. Heavy snow can harm trees and bushes. A good trimming can prevent additional damage. Grab your clippers and spend some time outside.

Getting your home ready now means more fun this summer! 

It’s Time to Get to that Spring Cleaning!

Angry woman vacuuming while man is resting

It may be too early to get out and do a lot of garden prep for spring, but it’s definitely not too early to get going on some spring cleaning jobs inside your home. Here are a few things to tackle inside to get your home springtime fresh, while you wait a little longer to start on garden prep.

Clean walls and ceilings. When was the last time you did this? Use a vacuum cleaner attachment to remove dust; test a degreaser in a hidden area of the kitchen to tackle that room’s walls with a degreaser and sponge.

Dust books and bookshelves. It’s time to take books off the bookshelves and actually dust them. And before you put them back, clean the shelves, too. And while you’re at it… now may be the perfect time to donate some of those books that you’re really not going to read again (or for the first time) to a local nonprofit.

And then dust the rest of your house. Dust from top to bottom, in the hard-to-get-to places and in the obvious places. Clean the top of the fridge, the top of curtain rods, the baseboards, and behind furniture. Always work from the top of the home to the floor and don’t use sprays, which really attract and hold more dust.

And then vacuum. A quick vacuum after the dusting will let you get any of the dust that lands on the floors.

Change out the batteries. Now’s a good time to change the tired batteries in smoke detectors and CO2 monitors. You should do this a couple of times a year, so if you do it now, mark your calendar for Halloween and change them out then, too.

Clean window treatments. Some draperies and curtains may be machine washable so read your labels. Some may be dry cleanable. And blinds are always ready for a thorough dusting. These items are dirt magnets. Do it now and you won’t cringe when it’s time to open your windows.

These are a few odd jobs that will get you started on spring cleaning. Don’t try to do the whole house at once. Start with these tasks and tackle others later. When your home is springtime fresh, you’ll be glad you put this effort in!

Get Out in the Garden. It’s Spring!

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Whether you’re caught in a streak of warm winter weather or you’re finding a day of warm weather here and there, Spring Fever hits as soon as the sun starts staying out a little longer. And although we know there is probably more snow in our future, who can resist getting outside and getting a start on the garden? Winter is the ideal time to clean up the lawn, trim some trees, prep your flower beds and take care of some other chores that get you outside.

Start cleaning up your lawn. Begin by raking to open up the lawn so new seeds can germinate. Then level the lawn by covering the lowest areas with new soil. Finally, reseed where necessary or even reseed the entire lawn. To ensure the seeds germinate, add a good fertilizer and cover the seeds with humus to keep the birds from finding them. Why do this in the winter? You get enough natural water, without having to sprinkle.

Be ready to get rid of crab grass. During the winter, crab grass waits and gets ready to sprout in the spring. Be ready to spray with pre-emergent about the last week of February, or just before the temperatures start to get warmer.

Prune those trees! Prune your trees and rose bushes now, before they start to bud, in order to improve the production of flowers and fruit. Cut back overgrown bushes, too. Clean trees from the inside out, removing crossing branches and cutting thin branches.

Prep your flower beds. Remove fallen leaves and pine needles to get these beds ready for spring’s favorite flowers. If you want even more flower beds, determine now where you will put them and start clearing those areas. And, if you’re a container gardener, check out your local stores now to see what pots may be on sale from last year.

What About Flowers that Have Spring Fever and Bloom Early? Here’s How You Can Protect Them.

If you haven’t already, protect your bulbs with mulch, even those that haven’t yet peeked through the soil. Mulch is ideal because it doesn’t have to be removed and replaced repeatedly throughout the early spring months. Adding a layer now will protect your early bloomers.

For large flower beds, if you have time and gumption, build a frame to create a tent then cover the plants with newspaper, bed sheets, lightweight blankets, burlap or floating row covers. If you don’t have time to create a frame, lay the cover directly onto the plant. This will help to slow the loss of heat rising from the foliage and the ground. Use rocks or soil to hold down the ends.

Never use plastic sheeting to cover plants. Plastic traps moisture inside and increases the possibility of frost damage.

If your daffodils and tulips pop up, they will want some protection from cold nights and mornings. Protect them before dusk with newspaper, bed sheets or light blankets. By the time it gets dark, much of the stored heat in the garden has been lost. Remove the covers in the morning once the frost has thawed and before the sun has a chance to overheat the plants under the cover.

Cover individual plants with jars, plastic milk jugs with the bottoms cut off, or upside-down flower pots. Or, fold triangles from newspapers and put soil or rocks in the edges to keep them from blowing away. Uncover them in the morning.

Put your Spring Fever to good use as winter comes to an end. And have a plan to protect your early bloomers for a warm and colorful spring.

Buying a Home this Spring? Make Sure You Get the Details Right.

Front Door Flowers

Spring marks the beginning of the selling season and is often considered the busiest and best time to purchase a home. As more people look to purchase a home in the coming months, it’s important to understand the buying process. Here are some tips from DORA (Department of Regulatory Agencies) and the Division of Real Estate.

Talk to your lender early in the process. Meet with your lender before contacting a real estate agent to simplify the home buying process. Getting prequalified for a mortgage gives you a solid price range for homes to consider.

Determine your working relationship with your broker. Many homebuyers don’t know that Colorado has two options when it comes to your relationship with your broker – a Single Agency broker (an agent for the buyer OR seller) or a Transaction Broker (for the buyer or seller OR both). A single agency broker will advocate for and work solely on a single client’s behalf. A transaction broker facilitates the sale by fully informing the parties, presenting all offers and assisting the parties with any contracts, including the closing of the transaction without being an agent or advocate for any of the parties.

Understand the real estate contract. An offer for the purchase of real estate must be in writing to be valid. The Colorado Real Estate Commission requires every real estate broker licensee use a contract form approved by the Real Estate Commission, unless the contract is drawn by either the seller or buyer or the attorney for the buyer or seller.

Recognize contingencies in the contract. The contract approved by the Real Estate Commission allows for the buyer and their licensed broker to make the contract contingent on certain items. Contingencies can be items such as the property appraising for the purchase price, approval of financing, a satisfactory home inspection, or the sale of their current residence. It is critical for a buyer to include those contingency items in the contract to eliminate misunderstandings about what circumstances will allow for a successful execution of the transaction.

Meet all deadlines and put down your earnest money. Once your offer has been accepted by the seller, you will put down a good faith deposit, often called earnest money. Both the buyer and seller will need to meet specific deadlines before you close on your home. As a buyer, if you miss a deadline, you might not be able to cancel or withdraw your offer unless you are willing to forfeit your earnest money. Your offer allows you to make decisions regarding when to close on your new property, when you can take possession of that property, and what remedies are available if the contract dates are not met.

This is a lot of information. If you’re ready to get started on the homebuying process, contact us to start with step one and get you pre-qualified today.