9 Tips to Get Your Home Ready for Spring

senior man stands on ladder and cleans a roof gutter

Spring’s popping up all over. Longer days, early blooms – these are signs that it’s time to make some simple home repairs after the long winter. Here are 9 simple jobs to take care of in order to make sure you’re ready for the change of seasons.

Inspect your roof. Check for loose or missing shingles, and ensure that seals around skylights are in tact and that chimney flashing is still in good shape. You don’t want any leaks during spring showers.

Check your gutters. While you’re inspecting your roof, inspect your gutters, too. They may have been overworked in the winter, with ice dams and falling branches. Clear the debris, check your downspouts and drains, and make sure the gutters are still secured to the house.

Check your pipes. Pipes that freeze and then thaw can cause some problems. Look for sign of damage under your sinks. And while you’re checking pipes, now is a good time to check your washing machine and dishwasher hoses and do a quick check in the attic, basement and crawl spaces for leaks.

Inspect your siding. Do a quick walk-around of your house and make sure no siding has been damaged or come loose.

Caulk your windows and doors to make sure these are sealed and still able to protect your windows and doors from water getting in.

Check your screens for tears. As long as you’re caulking your windows, check your screens, too. If any have tears or holes, now is a good time to repair those so you can open your windows and let in the fresh air.

Patch driveway and sidewalk cracks. Shoveling and salt can do a job on your cement in the winter, leading to cracks. Repair these now to keep them from growing and causing bigger problems.

Get your heating and air system checked. Call a qualified and recommended HVAC technician to come out and do a check on your system. Your heater worked hard in the winter and now your air conditioning is going to work hard in the summer. Make sure it’s in top condition. And, while you’re at it, change your filters.

Check trees and bushes for broken limbs and snapped branches. Heavy snow can harm trees and bushes. A good trimming can prevent additional damage. Grab your clippers and spend some time outside.

Getting your home ready now means more fun this summer! 

It’s Time to Get to that Spring Cleaning!

Angry woman vacuuming while man is resting

It may be too early to get out and do a lot of garden prep for spring, but it’s definitely not too early to get going on some spring cleaning jobs inside your home. Here are a few things to tackle inside to get your home springtime fresh, while you wait a little longer to start on garden prep.

Clean walls and ceilings. When was the last time you did this? Use a vacuum cleaner attachment to remove dust; test a degreaser in a hidden area of the kitchen to tackle that room’s walls with a degreaser and sponge.

Dust books and bookshelves. It’s time to take books off the bookshelves and actually dust them. And before you put them back, clean the shelves, too. And while you’re at it… now may be the perfect time to donate some of those books that you’re really not going to read again (or for the first time) to a local nonprofit.

And then dust the rest of your house. Dust from top to bottom, in the hard-to-get-to places and in the obvious places. Clean the top of the fridge, the top of curtain rods, the baseboards, and behind furniture. Always work from the top of the home to the floor and don’t use sprays, which really attract and hold more dust.

And then vacuum. A quick vacuum after the dusting will let you get any of the dust that lands on the floors.

Change out the batteries. Now’s a good time to change the tired batteries in smoke detectors and CO2 monitors. You should do this a couple of times a year, so if you do it now, mark your calendar for Halloween and change them out then, too.

Clean window treatments. Some draperies and curtains may be machine washable so read your labels. Some may be dry cleanable. And blinds are always ready for a thorough dusting. These items are dirt magnets. Do it now and you won’t cringe when it’s time to open your windows.

These are a few odd jobs that will get you started on spring cleaning. Don’t try to do the whole house at once. Start with these tasks and tackle others later. When your home is springtime fresh, you’ll be glad you put this effort in!

Get Out in the Garden. It’s Spring!

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Whether you’re caught in a streak of warm winter weather or you’re finding a day of warm weather here and there, Spring Fever hits as soon as the sun starts staying out a little longer. And although we know there is probably more snow in our future, who can resist getting outside and getting a start on the garden? Winter is the ideal time to clean up the lawn, trim some trees, prep your flower beds and take care of some other chores that get you outside.

Start cleaning up your lawn. Begin by raking to open up the lawn so new seeds can germinate. Then level the lawn by covering the lowest areas with new soil. Finally, reseed where necessary or even reseed the entire lawn. To ensure the seeds germinate, add a good fertilizer and cover the seeds with humus to keep the birds from finding them. Why do this in the winter? You get enough natural water, without having to sprinkle.

Be ready to get rid of crab grass. During the winter, crab grass waits and gets ready to sprout in the spring. Be ready to spray with pre-emergent about the last week of February, or just before the temperatures start to get warmer.

Prune those trees! Prune your trees and rose bushes now, before they start to bud, in order to improve the production of flowers and fruit. Cut back overgrown bushes, too. Clean trees from the inside out, removing crossing branches and cutting thin branches.

Prep your flower beds. Remove fallen leaves and pine needles to get these beds ready for spring’s favorite flowers. If you want even more flower beds, determine now where you will put them and start clearing those areas. And, if you’re a container gardener, check out your local stores now to see what pots may be on sale from last year.

What About Flowers that Have Spring Fever and Bloom Early? Here’s How You Can Protect Them.

If you haven’t already, protect your bulbs with mulch, even those that haven’t yet peeked through the soil. Mulch is ideal because it doesn’t have to be removed and replaced repeatedly throughout the early spring months. Adding a layer now will protect your early bloomers.

For large flower beds, if you have time and gumption, build a frame to create a tent then cover the plants with newspaper, bed sheets, lightweight blankets, burlap or floating row covers. If you don’t have time to create a frame, lay the cover directly onto the plant. This will help to slow the loss of heat rising from the foliage and the ground. Use rocks or soil to hold down the ends.

Never use plastic sheeting to cover plants. Plastic traps moisture inside and increases the possibility of frost damage.

If your daffodils and tulips pop up, they will want some protection from cold nights and mornings. Protect them before dusk with newspaper, bed sheets or light blankets. By the time it gets dark, much of the stored heat in the garden has been lost. Remove the covers in the morning once the frost has thawed and before the sun has a chance to overheat the plants under the cover.

Cover individual plants with jars, plastic milk jugs with the bottoms cut off, or upside-down flower pots. Or, fold triangles from newspapers and put soil or rocks in the edges to keep them from blowing away. Uncover them in the morning.

Put your Spring Fever to good use as winter comes to an end. And have a plan to protect your early bloomers for a warm and colorful spring.

Are You and Your Neighbors Ready for a Neighborhood Watch Program?

Garden surveillance

A lot of us pay a little extra attention to the house next door or across the street when our neighbors are gone, but taking it a step further and creating a neighborhood watch program may be the ticket to an even more crime-free home base.

Launched in 1972, the official Neighborhood Watch program was designed to count on citizens to organize themselves and work with law enforcement to keep a trained eye and ear on their communities, while demonstrating their presence at all times of day and night. According to the National Sheriff’s Association, Neighborhood Watch works because it reduces opportunities for crime to occur; it doesn’t rely on altering or changing the criminal’s behavior or motivation.

Over time the program has found its way into neighborhoods all over America, borrowing from the principles of the original program to create groups, often called citizen alert, community watch, block watch, or another variation.

Why start a neighborhood watch group?

  • The most obvious reason to organize a neighborhood watch program is to prevent crime. Groups that meet regularly and communicate efficiently are the most effective at reducing incidents.
  • Another reason to form a group is to create awareness and camaraderie. Alert neighbors can stop crime and keep residents, safe while making the neighborhood a more welcoming environment.
  • In addition, neighborhood watch groups can alert you to other issues, such as cars speeding through neighborhoods, challenges with children, and animal control issues. Together, you can solve more challenges that arise, while building friendships!

How do you get started forming a neighborhood watch group?

  • Recruit your neighbors to participate.
  • Contact law enforcement to receive the training and information you need.
  • Discuss concerns and create a plan – what is most important to you and your neighbors?
  • Establish your neighborhood’s method of communication.
  • Hold regular meetings and training exercises to keep engaged.
  • Don’t be a vigilante! Report suspicious activity to police immediately.

Even with all of today’s surveillance technology, you can’t beat people watching out for people. Check out Neighborhood Watch if you are ready to get started watching out for your neighbors.

Considering Purchasing in HOA?

Aerial view of a Cookie Cutter Neighborhood

The Colorado Department of Regulatory Agencies (DORA) offers some tips on things to consider if you’re purchasing in an HOA (home owners association). Some people love being part of an HOA neighborhood; others do not. Here are a few tips to consider before making your move.

Considering purchasing in an HOA?
Make sure you have the necessary documentation: HOAs have bylaws, covenants, rules and regulations, so obtain copies of these documents to know the HOA’s responsibilities as well as your rights as a new member. You will also want to get copies of the Colorado Common Interest Ownership Act (CCIOA) and the Colorado Nonprofit Act which are the state laws governing HOAs.

Be aware of your HOA’s enforcement powers: HOAs are able to enforce their covenants, rules, regulations and bylaws through various methods such as fining, placing a lien on an owner’s property, sending an owner’s account to collections or filing a civil lawsuit in court. Knowing under what circumstances and what the processes are to take these enforcement actions are important.

Get involved: The best way to become part of the community and make a difference in your HOA is to get involved. All HOA meetings are open to homeowners except for executive sessions. Make sure to attend HOA meetings, stay up to date on what’s happening in your community, share your ideas and voice your concerns.

Resources are available: The HOA Information and Resource Center at DORA has invaluable information and resources to answer your questions, educate you on HOAs and assist you with difficult and sensitive situations. K

The Division encourages everyone to visit the Division’s website at www.dora.colorado.gov/dre to ensure that their real estate broker is properly licensed.