Spring Clean Your Financial Paperwork

Couple managing the debt

If you’re spring cleaning, you might be ready to go through your entire house and get rid of anything that doesn’t bring you joy. While your financial paperwork likely isn’t something that brings you joy, that doesn’t mean you can toss it into the trash. Learn about what you should be saving, how long you need to keep it, and how you can organize it, so it fits in with your newly tidy house.

Tax Returns: Keep for three years from the date you filed. If you filed a claim for a loss, keep for your return seven years.

Receipts: Keep receipts for itemized deductions on your tax return with your tax records for three years.

Paycheck Stubs: Keep until the end of the year.

Medical Bills: Keep for one year. If you deduct medical expenses on your taxes, keep with the returns for three years.

Utility Bills: Keep for one year. If you claim a home office tax deduction on your taxes, keep with the returns for three years.

Bank Statements: Keep for three years.

Credit Card Statements: Keep until you can confirm the charges and have paid the bill. Keep for three years if you need them for tax deductions.

Paid Off Loans: Keep for seven years.

Active Contracts, Property Records, Insurance Documents, and Stock Certificates: Keep as long as they’re active. Once they’re complete, you can discard.

Marriage License, Birth Certificates, Adoption Papers, Wills, Death Certificates, and Paid Mortgages: Keep forever.

Once you have all your financial papers in order, purchase a few storage boxes to hold everything. Label the outside with what’s in the box so you always know where your important financial documents are located.

Source: Her Money

It’s Time to Get to that Spring Cleaning!

Angry woman vacuuming while man is resting

It may be too early to get out and do a lot of garden prep for spring, but it’s definitely not too early to get going on some spring cleaning jobs inside your home. Here are a few things to tackle inside to get your home springtime fresh, while you wait a little longer to start on garden prep.

Clean walls and ceilings. When was the last time you did this? Use a vacuum cleaner attachment to remove dust; test a degreaser in a hidden area of the kitchen to tackle that room’s walls with a degreaser and sponge.

Dust books and bookshelves. It’s time to take books off the bookshelves and actually dust them. And before you put them back, clean the shelves, too. And while you’re at it… now may be the perfect time to donate some of those books that you’re really not going to read again (or for the first time) to a local nonprofit.

And then dust the rest of your house. Dust from top to bottom, in the hard-to-get-to places and in the obvious places. Clean the top of the fridge, the top of curtain rods, the baseboards, and behind furniture. Always work from the top of the home to the floor and don’t use sprays, which really attract and hold more dust.

And then vacuum. A quick vacuum after the dusting will let you get any of the dust that lands on the floors.

Change out the batteries. Now’s a good time to change the tired batteries in smoke detectors and CO2 monitors. You should do this a couple of times a year, so if you do it now, mark your calendar for Halloween and change them out then, too.

Clean window treatments. Some draperies and curtains may be machine washable so read your labels. Some may be dry cleanable. And blinds are always ready for a thorough dusting. These items are dirt magnets. Do it now and you won’t cringe when it’s time to open your windows.

These are a few odd jobs that will get you started on spring cleaning. Don’t try to do the whole house at once. Start with these tasks and tackle others later. When your home is springtime fresh, you’ll be glad you put this effort in!

Get a Jump Start on Spring Cleaning

Angry woman vacuuming while man is resting

It may be too early to get out and do a lot of garden prep for spring, but it’s definitely not too early to get going on some spring cleaning jobs inside your home. Here are a few things to tackle inside to get your home springtime fresh, while you wait a little longer to start on garden prep.

Clean walls and ceilings. When was the last time you did this? Use a vacuum cleaner attachment to remove dust; test a degreaser in a hidden area of the kitchen to tackle that room’s walls with a degreaser and sponge.

Dust books and bookshelves. It’s time to take books off the bookshelves and actually dust them. And before you put them back, clean the shelves, too. And while you’re at it… now may be the perfect time to donate some of those books that you’re really not going to read again (or for the first time) to a local nonprofit.

And then dust the rest of your house. Dust from top to bottom, in the hard-to-get-to places and in the obvious places. Clean the top of the fridge, the top of curtain rods, the baseboards, and behind furniture. Always work from the top of the home to the floor and don’t use sprays, which really attract and hold more dust.

And then vacuum. A quick vacuum after the dusting will let you get any of the dust that lands on the floors.

Change the batteries. Now’s a good time to change the tired batteries in smoke detectors and CO2 monitors. You should do this a couple of times a year, so if you do it now, mark your calendar for Halloween and change them out then, too.

Clean window treatments. Some draperies and curtains may be machine washable so read your labels. Some may be dry cleanable. And blinds are always ready for a thorough dusting. These items are dirt magnets. Do it now and you won’t cringe when it’s time to open your windows.

These are a few odd jobs that will get you started on spring cleaning. Don’t try to do the whole house at once. Start with these tasks and tackle others later. When you’re home is springtime fresh, you’ll be glad you put this effort in!